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We Yone Child Foundation in Partnership with Concern Worldwide organize Football competition, Boxing, and Martial Arts for Girls in Kroobay Community

We Yone Child Foundation in Partnership with Concernworld organize Football competition, Boxing, and Martial Arts for Girls in Kroobay Community

In celebration of this year’s International Women’s Day, with the theme: ‘Women in Leadership: Achieving an Equal Future In a Covid-19 World,’ The We Yone Child Foundation, a Non-Governmental Organization registered in Sierra Leone providing sustainable education and care to underprivileged children in Kroo Bay and George Brook communities, and help to overcome the social and environmental problems that deepen and perpetuate the cycle of poverty in these communities with support from ‘Concern Worldwide‘ organized an event at the Kroo Bay community with over fifty children in a Marshal Art training for the past few months and as well as a football competition between the We Yone Child Primary School and Orthodox Primary School to the community to inspire and motivate other girls in other communities to believe in themselves. Their coach, during an interview, disclosed to us why they are engaging the children.

“Children, especially girls experience violence in this community. The essence of this boxing and Martial Arts training is for women to be able to tackle violence; especially sexual violence. So we are more focused on the young girls to give them the early training, to empower the girls to be able to self-defense when the need arises,” said Coach Desmond Coal.

Abigail Sesay, one of the participants said during an interview: “I am not a violent person, but I hear and see violence against women every day. I have joined this training to be able to defend myself against domestic violence. I want to be able to defend myself when I could find no one to come to my aid.”

The second segment of the program was the football competition, which, according to the organization, was geared towards promoting peace and ensuring that women’s and girls’ participation in what is known as “men’s sport” is greatly felt.

Hannah Kabbah, the Gender Desk Officer told us: “We feel good on this International Women’s Day to partner with  Concern WorldWide to work in Kroo Bay Community, to do both the football competition and Marshall Arts. We are happy that women are now taking part in what was used to be called men’s activity in our country. We are certain that with the young people we are training in these communities, they will be future leaders in our country. We want to give our special thanks and appreciation to our partner Concern Worldwide for their support.”

Hannah Kabbah the Gender Desk Officer

The football match ended with 1 goal against the We Yone Child Foundation Primary School a goal scored by a 12-year-old girl in the 5 minutes of the first half.

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Written by Sallu Kamuskay

Sallu Kamuskay is a Sierra Leonean activist, storyteller, and blogger. He was born in Sierra Leone but later relocated to Guinea as a refugee because of the war in his country. Sallu Kamuskay uses his phone to engage on social media, under the name ‘’Salone Messenger’. He Co-Founded the Salone Messenger platform after his experience of the war, Ebola, and injustices. According to him, silence was the root cause of war, and of many social injustices, we continue to face as a nation. In 2013, during the Ebola crisis, Sallu Kamuskay took the risk and volunteered to fight Ebola. He spent some months in both safe and unsafe places; helping the victims and telling their sad stories. The election in 2018, left a divided country with communities fighting on tribal lines. This inspired Sallu Kamuskay to serve as the coordinator of the United Sierra Leone peace concert, which was organized in 4 major parts of the country, targeting violent communities and troubled youth. Sallu Kamuskay led a group of entertainers, activists, and organizations across the country on a peace tour, a program supported by the European Union, United Sierra Leone, Africa Union, ECOWAS, and the Messeh Leone Trust. Sallu Kamuakay has also served as a staff writer for the Hidden Voices Magazine.
Over the years, Sallu Kamuskay has been using his Techno phone to be able to tell stories, the phone he used to tell the story of Gbessay during Ebola who was admitted at one of the Ebola treatment centers after rumors that she had Ebola when the actual sickness was ulcer, she was almost abandoned at the treatment canter with no medication provided to her. She could have died. Sallu told the story via social media and was able to secure funding from the United Sierra Leone to buy her medication and advocated for her. She was later discharged and taken home, He did the same to a patient that died and was abandoned in the street, Sallu Kamuskay used his phone and shared the message across, the corps was later taken and buried. It could have been more disaster without his voice. The story of late America Stress 3-year-old daughter. The hero’s daughter was abandon after his father's death. He shared her sad story and was able to get a sister who has taken the child as her own and is currently providing her with educational support. The article of America Stress can be read on the link below http://ayvnewspaper.com/index.php/k2-categories/item/7350-america-stress-a-hero-to-recognize.
Sallu Kamuskay feels the stories of Gbessay, America stress and that of many others need to be told. The media house we have cannot better tell these stories, they are better reporters than telling human interest stories. He created the Salone Messenger platform and brought together passionate storytellers to be able to tell these compelling stories.

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